Encouragement Uncategorized

What I Learned From Hillary Clinton

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Hillary has been in the game for a long time. To be honest, I didn’t think about her very much before Bill did the Monica thing. After that, I only thought about her in relation to the Monica thing. When she was appointed Secretary of State, I figured she had been around long enough to do a decent job. Then when rumor spread that she wanted that Democratic nomination in 2008, I was like hmm that’s interesting. In the last year or so, I’ve been with her, not with her, and then with her again. In any case, I realized that she has been a person I’ve been familiar with since I was in middle school. Obviously I don’t know her personally, but she makes decisions that affect me or at least affect American society at large. I feel connected to her. So she’s like one of those girls you went to high school with who wasn’t in your circle but maybe she ended up at your graduation party with a friend of a friend and it was all good because she was SGA president and advocated for softer tissue in the girl’s bathroom. You saw her come in and yelled “Fix you a plate, KeKe!” because she wasn’t your friend necessarily but you eff with her.

That’s what Hillary is to me – not my friend necessarily but I eff with her. I grew up with her. She has been at least somewhat influential to me, and these are just a few of the things I’ve learned from her:

If you stay ready you ain’t got to get ready.

People say this all the time, but it’s one of those things that’s way easier said than done. Hillary came out the gate ready. She went to an ivy league, married someone who had crazy potential (lest his wandering eye), and then got straight to work. She parlayed her position as first lady into an influential government position, got some stupid good experience, shook hands and kissed babies, and then came out the gate swinging against Obama in that first go ‘round. She didn’t get the nomination (of course she didn’t get the nomination because she cool but she ain’t Obama), so then she kept doing the things that would put her in position to run again. Now I’m not saying that she had her eye on the presidency when she met Bill or even when she first moved into the White House. And I’m not saying that her every step was perfection, but I’m saying that she probably knew she wouldn’t have an ordinary life and there are things a person has to do to attain and then maintain that kind of thing. The same could be said for any of us. If we want extraordinary, we should be putting ourselves in a position to receive the extraordinary when the opportunity arises. We for dang sure can’t wait to get the degree, wait to take the certificate courses, wait to lose the weight, wait to read the books or write the blog posts. We have to be doing what needs to be done so that we’re ready before we need to be ready.

 

Bounce back game gotta be strong. 

Sometimes you shoot the shot, and that ish don’t hit. Baby. Listen. When I woke up in the wee hours of the night and saw that Hilary hadn’t won that election, I was hurt. All in my chest. Mighta shed a tear. Wore all black the next day. Full on mourning. So I can only imagine her shock. Her disappointment. Her pride, dismantled and crushed by this completely made up thing we call an electoral college. (Wtf is it? Who made this ish?) But then I saw this article not a week later with her taking a picture with a lady while out walking her dogs. She was smiling. Looked fresh actually. And I was thinking, she’s walking them dogs? Man eff them dogs! Trump is president! But y’all, the dogs gotta be walked. Bill drug her through the mud with that Monica thing (and several other indiscretions), her personal emails got displayed to the entire world, she had a few real bad haircuts and pantsuits that I personally trashed her about, but she had to get up the next day and walk them dogs then too.

Bounce back game gotta be so strong that your moment of defeat doesn’t last long enough that you to miss the opportunity to take the next shot. (Read my post about shooting your shot) The thing about being great is that you sort of have to get other people to recognize it. Not always but sometimes. When you want to make a bigger impact and you know you have the talent to do it, you have to convince others that you’re the person to do it. So you put yourself out there. You run for office, apply for the job, pitch the book, start the blog, or open up shop. Then you wait on folks to like it. You take the risk – the risk that other people are too afraid to take. And the thing about risk is that there are odds stacked against you. Odds are, you’ll “fail” sometimes. You won’t get the vote, the promotion, the book deal, the Instagram likes or the business. Sometimes you won’t even get your edges back. It’s so disappointing. More than disappointing. It can be devastating. When this happens, it’s cool to take a minute to get yourself together. My mom calls this your “human time”. You need a while to recognize and validate your emotions. After that minute is over, you gotta bounce back. EVERYBODY has been rejected and every one of us have to learn how to get it back together. Quickly. Because the next thing is on the horizon.

Ultimately, the only person you can control is yourself. 

At the end of the day. When the dust settles. When it’s all said and done. When the clock strikes 12. (I was going to try to add another one of these euphemisms here but I couldn’t think of one.) The only person you are in control of is yourself. Your husband can act a plum fool (and Bill showed ALL THE WAY OUT). Your closest friends may leak your emails. Your country might elect a racist, elitist, jerk of a homophobe over you. Your parents might neglect you, your boss might betray you, your dog may even run away. You cannot dictate what they do, but you can always choose to be in authority over yourself. And it really does take a high level of discipline and restraint to be the person you need to be in every situation. I think the key is to know who you are, imagine what you want to become and then decide to walk in that or toward that in every moment. It takes not letting anyone else, even your closest confidants, steer you off that course. When you know yourself and can see the potential in yourself to become everything you’ve dreamed, no one else can call you a loser. No one else can call you a liar. They can’t think you’re unqualified. They are unable to pity you. And it’s because even when you’ve lost, you aren’t a loser. When you’ve lied, you aren’t a liar. When you don’t have the experience they expect, you are not unqualified. You are who you think you are because you are in control of yourself – your emotions, your reactions, your tongue, your body language, your outlook. If you are who you think you are, other people don’t even matter much. They will come and mess some stuff up, and you will still be the best in the game.

 

tumblr_inline_o5w3ycflbp1ta7ve7_1280So yeah, I owe Hillary a thank you. I have my qualms with her. Like I said, she’s like one of those girls I never hung with in high school and never really wanted to, but she’s always welcome at my house party. “Fix you a plate, Hillary!”

 

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I'm Mariah. Jesus is my homie. I live in (and was raised in) the south. I am, as often as possible, actively grateful for my family because I understand their life giving power. Really dislike melodramatics. Really love reading and writing so much so that I aspire to be an author. What else?

44 comments on “What I Learned From Hillary Clinton

  1. I enjoyed reading this! Thank you!

  2. I would not say that Hillary Clinton was “my girl” during her campaign because for me she was simply the lesser of the evils to be honest. However, I would not take away her expertise in politics, but I would question some of her “politics” the one that comes to mind is her mindset of young African American boys when she called them “Predators”. Also not withstanding the fact that she was married to the man who initiated the Three Strikes policy during his Presidency, which immensely affected African Americans and other minorities, I have to say that she was very comfortable in her role as First Lady.

    As First Lady came the incident of her husband’s (and POTUS) infidelity she faced public embarrassment and humiliation, but her self-efficacy, at least during her time in the public’s eye seemed unwavering. She chose to still speak mindful on his behalf and display the upmost of self-esteem during that scandalous time.

    • I definitely understand your perspective. I agree that Hillary is not faultless. I also don’t think she has the kind of empathy or understanding for people of color that I would want a presidential candidate to have. I would challenge your statement that she was the lesser of the two evils. Hillary cannot be compared to Donald Trump in terms of the threat that each of them present to racial and ethnic minorities, women, the LGBT community, immigrants, or the poor. These groups of people are undoubtedly worse off with Donald Trump than they would be with Hillary Clinton. Even considering her faults, she is not nearly as dangerous to them as Trump is. Thank you for your feedback and comments! I enjoyed it.

  3. Hillary Clinton is what the Irish call a “legend”. She is there, after she has been afflicted to all kinds of mental torture. An ordinary human would be crushed for life if they were betrayed by those closest to them. Hillary though, went through this plenty of times and comes back stronger every time. In my opinion, nobody could or has portrayed themselves to be a better “first women president”, maybe Michelle Obama, certainly not the Trump ladies. She resonates all of the strong characteristics of a woman, and emotionally, can make decisions more decisively and with conviction than many men at her position ever could. I still and will never know how the “orange” got elected, neither will I understand how someone who instills “democracies” in the rest of the world haven’t yet fixed their outdated electoral college election system. Common sense isn’t so common after all, if it was, I wouldn’t be writing this right now.

    • Thanks for your feedback on this. I agree with your assessment that the electoral college system is outdated and does not resonate with most people as inclusive of all votes. It’s part of the reason that so many people feel like their vote doesn’t count. You’re right on target with that one.

  4. Taylor Bryant

    When I began reading the introductory part of this article I was unknowing of what direction it was going in. I am very hesitant about discussions regarding Hilary Clinton or the election in general because it is a very sensitive subject for me, and just like the author, I have my qualms about her. But, continuing to read the article, I was thoroughly impressed with how she related Hilary Clinton’s experiences with general life lessons that everyone can benefit from. She didn’t get into the specifics of the election or Clinton’s past political record at all, but she instead took Hilary’s misfortunes and downfalls and turned them into necessary motivations for the success of all, while giving Hilary her credit for going through what she went through, and coming out strong. I enjoyed the tone and language used by the author because it was relatable to me. I was also very touched by the advice given, and I am going to take it and apply it to my life.

  5. Overall this article was interesting, funny and serious as the same time. This to me relates to what we have talked in class about self-esteem. Not letting people decide what I do or think because at the end of the day it is about me, myself, and I on what is right and wrong. The fact that many believe she was going to be unhappy and give up because Hillary lost the nomination back fires on the psychological egoism, because it was not true since the next day she continued with her life and duties she is responsible for. She represents the ethical egoism of what she believed what she needs to do for herself and if it is crying all day or trying it again and do better than.

    • Thanks so much for commenting on the blog post. You’ve given me several terms to read more about – psychological egoism and ethical egoism. I feel smarter already 😉

  6. Hillary Clinton is inspirational not only to women everywhere but people around the world as well. She inspired people by overcoming adversity that would have had other people quit, she overcame loss and she continues to be a public figure where she is looked up to. Hillary Clinton overcame a publically humiliating experience when her husband had an affair on her with another woman. Now instead of dwelling on it, Hillary accepted it and worked towards growth and a stronger relationship with Bill. What happened behind closed doors, one can not be certain, my guess would be she was not to impressed, probably some heated discussions as well. Secondly, she ran for presidency, a step that no woman to date had taken as the leading candidate of a major party. Again, the overcoming of loss proved just how mentally strong and durable Mrs. Clinton was. After losing to a man whose campaign was based off of hatred and open ended threats had ultimately won, and Hillary so graciously accepted defeat amongst disbelief. The final thing that puts Hillary Clinton as an inspiration in my eyes is how she handled herself during the defeat. Similar to what we have recently discussed in class along the lines of egoism. Hillary day in and day out is an example of how to behave. Not only individiual egoism but ethical egoism as well. She displayed that someone with such a large following should handle themselves. Looking back at the three things I previously mentioned: overcoming adversity, overcoming loss and being a highly regarded public figure, without a strong understanding and display of egoism(s), this might not have been possible in her journey to reach where she is today.

    • Thanks for commenting on the blog post. You’ve made some excellent points all around. Any person who can find a way to bounce back after such major losses definitely possesses attributes that I would want to build in myself.

  7. I understand why it’s revitalizing to see that the election didn’t break the woman at the center of it. But her speeches feel like a chronicle of Clinton’s diminishing expectations and increasingly somber acknowledgments of what a woman must endure if she’s going to persist. She is a strong woman I have never see, she fights for her dream. what I know is she didn’t always think of running for office. Yet after years of supporting her husband in the white house, she decided to take her own advice. If you think you’d do a good job, you should run. As a female candidate for the presidential election, Hillary has faced a huge amount of criticism. But nothing can stop her What I learn from this is that, regardless of what’s being said about you, your own resolve will always get you through. Trust yourself and your career decisions, and don’t look back

    • I love the point you’ve made about taking the chance to do something yourself if you think you’d be good at it. Sometimes we think it takes some extra special person to do certain things but in reality, it just takes a regular person who believes in themselves. I hope more and more people start to recognize that.

  8. As earth shattering as it was to watch, I was in no way shocked or surprised to see Trump win the presidency. Trump became the savior for working and middle class Americans who, up until that point, did not feel as though their voices and needs were being heard or addressed. I’m not saying Trump’s words were good or truthful, but he told people what they wanted to hear and they revered him for that. Trump clearly saw the need in identifying with a large segment of the population to gain momentum as a viable candidate. He exploited egoistic predispositions and projected a feeling of self-entitlement that voters craved.

    In contrast, Hillary relied on her resume and gender, expecting people to flock to her to win. For the first time, beginning in 2010, a minority was in office, and Hillary assumed America would be on board to continue this progressive trend. Except, she did not communicate a sense of commonality to connect the American people. As much as Hillary wanted to win and believed in her abilities to be president, I do not think she was ever “ready” to run for the presidency. The qualities of a president and the skills needed to become president are very different.

    I am proud of the strength and self-respect Hillary allowed herself to reclaim following the election. I do not fault her for receding from the public eye. She needed time to mourn the loss of the presidency and process the failure of her campaign. I commend Hillary for challenging the norm and pursuing what, for most, is the unattainable. Although she did not win, her ability to prevail signifies great hope and possibility for the future of America.

    • I agree with you that Trump appealed to the masses. I think there were too many people in this country who felt overlooked and Trump was able to capitalize on that. I disagree that Hillary was not ready to run for the presidency. She was the probably one of the most qualified people to ever run. She was certainly more qualified than Trump who had absolutely no experience holding public office. Overwhelmingly, people were less impressed with her experience than they were with Trump’s rhetoric. It’s unfortunate that it played out that way but it did.

  9. Yo. First off, this was probably the best read Ive read in a long time. I think its because it was so real, it was like you were talking to me instead of me reading it, you know. Half the time people just write issh just to sound smart but they don’t really grab the readers attention. This did it for me, Good job on that. But as for the topic, I definitely feel everything you said about Hillary. She was ji like that low-key chick in the cut but always had a lil name, but then she came out in the election, and everybody was like, we aint got nobody else, we might as well see what shawty talking bout. I will never forget her and Trumps first debate. That issh was hilarious. But you right, even after all the BS with the election and government in general, she is still holding it down and remaining classy. You can’t hate on that. I feel like the lessons that you’ve learned and expressed in this blog tie in really well with my life personally, but also to many around the world who feel like they can become anything that they want, and nowadays, you literally can. So thanks for this blog post. Peace.

    • You are very kind. I’m so glad you enjoyed the blog post. You have a very “real” writing style as well. You’re very funny. I agree that Hillary was sort of a “low key chick” meaning that she was unassuming until she began to get more and more involved in holding public office. You never know when it’ll be your turn to step up to the plate so you have to be ready.

  10. Edmund Taylor

    First of all I wanted to say this article was very well thought out and I loved how you put it in a perspective that I could relate to, the example of Hilary kind of being that friend of a friend. It honestly made me think about how Hilary must’ve felt after losing that election, which was something that didn’t even cross my mind at the time. But not just that, the mental resilience she has to have had to bounce back from probably the most crushing rejection someone can face in life. It relates back to what was mentioned in class with self-esteem. A persons self-esteem can take a shot or be damaged from a rejection so severe but like you mentioned, the only person you can control is yourself. You can decide to let your failure define you in a negative way or you can choose to use what you’ve learned from that to bounce back as a stronger more experienced person.

    • Absolutely. Failures are inevitable. They will come. The one thing we can control is how we respond to them. We can control ourselves. Some of your other classmates have talked about egoism and channeling our inner motivations to direct our actions. It’s definitely something to think about.

  11. I LIKE THIS ARTICLE . It shows how self esteem is important, Hilary Clinton Is a powerful women. she ran for candidate and she has been criticized with the story of her email . even though all things that was said about her she kept fighting. Because she know her value. she know she got the experience that something nobody can not remove. perseverance always pays!

  12. Antonio Boyd

    I love the way this article was written. Especially the DC lango. Instead of getting into the specifics, I like how you simply acknowledge that though she has her quirks, at the end of the day, she’s the one advocating for softer tissue in the girl’s bathroom (as you put it). Obviously Hillary Clinton is no stranger to controversy. Most politicians aren’t. But you know what you’re getting with her. And regardless of what your political stance or views are, I think most people would agree that both her resolve and her ability to persevere is commendable. Especially when compared to some male politicians who have been through much less (e.g. Jeb Bush. Watch “A Tribute To Jeb Bush” on Youtube).

    • Thanks for reading, Antonio. I agree that Hillary can serve as inspiration for people no matter their political party affiliation. She’s just a person. Her bounce back is strong.

  13. Ayanha Qawwee

    After reading the blog post What I Learned from Hillary Clinton my immediate thought was these are and have been my exact sentiments. My journey with being familiar with Hillary began when I was in the first grade in Okemos, Michigan. I got to miss a day of school because our then president, former president Bill Clinton was speaking at Michigan State University in East Lansing, Michigan, and my Mother had secured us tickets to his speaking engagement. My next memory of Hillary was when the Bill Clinton and Monica scandal rocked the White House. Although I was young, I understood that a man shouldn’t do anything to make his wife upset, and that is what our President did to his wife, Hillary. I didn’t understand the details. Fast forward some years and I’m finally old enough to vote! My excitement was so grand that I made sure to fill out my voter registration card a week before my birthday so it would be completed, mailed and submitted by my actual birthday. Finally, election voting begins and I cast my first ever presidential vote for who I consider my president emeritus, Barack Obama. Four year later, voting begins again, and again I cast my vote for Obama. Then we get to what I consider the beginning of a political nightmare for the United States, Donald Trump also known as “45” becomes a real candidate for president. Before supporting Hillary, I was completely for and with Bernie Sanders. Once he did not become an option, I knew that I had to “be with her”. I donated to the campaign, made calls on her behalf in Virginia, and attended rallies, I was completely committed to doing an and everything I could to make sure people not only voted, but voted for Hillary. I too had the same shock and disappointment that Hillary did not win however, I too had to “bounce back” despite feeling like the worst candidate ever in life was now in office. I decided I couldn’t stay in a state of shock, fear, or disappointment. I made the decision to become an even more intense social justice advocate for myself and my community, that no matter who is in office, I control me, I fight for myself, and I will always make my voice heard no matter what laws, groups of people, or clown in office tries to silence me.

    • Ayanha, you are a jewell. It takes exactly that kind of involvement to get good people in office. Progress is slow and sometimes it doesn’t go the way you think it should but you get back up and work for it.

  14. Kelsey Greene

    After reading “What I have learned from Hillary” it opened my eyes to another part of Hillary. No one ever really thinks of the “after” upon losing a race. Even though she was disappointed and upset after the race she still had to “walk the dogs”, metaphorically saying that just because you tried and you failed life still goes on, there are still things that need to be done.
    In class we talked about a passage called “Why Are All the Black Kids Sitting Together in the Cafeteria” which related back into identity and how humans have a strong sense of self. Hillary demonstrated she had a strong since of self the way she picked herself back up after and still did what she needed to, much like the African American individuals who are more likely to tell someone of their ethnic background, she was strong and was out and about after one of the hardest losses of her life.
    All in all Hillary employs great confidence and poise regarding how she carries herself and everything she has been through. Having those qualities as a person and a leader is really important and provides a great example to many people all around on how they should never give up no matter the situation.

    -Kelsey

  15. Sonny Meyers-Graham

    As the Article stated in what I learned from Hillary Clinton she was prepared, determined, resilient, and self-accountable. Like the author, I was with her, then not, then with again because I was one of those Bernie Sanders supporters, then had to go back to Hillary again once she was officially named the party candidate. Similarly, I was also a fan of Jill Stein who was also a strong determined woman with perhaps even more challenges because she wasn’t a major party favorite.

    My admiration of Hillary is that she was a strong woman. Maybe that even worked against her at times because she was so strong that most people did not find her trustworthy. because they could not relate to her. I felt that Hillary was respectable, knowledgeable, and confident and by the time of the vote she was the best, most qualified, candidate. The sad point is that I found her most relatable in her concession speech. This highlighted her strength, her conviction and dedication for America as a country, and her emotional depth for women. Perhaps if this would have become more transparent to Americans in the beginning and she would have had a better outcome.

    As the author stated the two main things that are impressive about Hillary is that no matter what she faces she is able to pick up the pieces and carry on with in a dignified and respectable way. Sometimes it’s not about how you look when you are winning its how you are when you are defeated and humiliated that really shows the content of your character.
    #OOMM

  16. Vanessa Valentine

    I found this blog to be humorous yet serious at the same time. You brought fourth many agreeable points. One being “The thing about being great is that you sort of have to get other people to recognize it. Not always but sometimes. When you want to make a bigger impact and you know you have the talent to do it, you have to convince others that you’re the person to do it. So you put yourself out there.” I agree with this statement because things don’t go exactly as planned, and we are left disappointed with the outcome of a situation. However dwelling on it, will only allow us to miss another opportunity in the horizon.

    I shared similar views with you on the Hilary vs. Trump campaign. You expressed “I was hurt. All in my chest. Mighta shed a tear. Wore all black the next day. Full on mourning.” After hearing that Trump was our new elected president, I shed some tears too. I couldn’t believe that a person with absolutely no qualifications as a president was now the president of the United States.

    I like how you kept it real. I always appreciate that aspect from writers. Overall I really enjoyed reading this. Thanks for the laugh.

  17. Asante Pearson

    This essay about Hillary is applicable to so many facets of adult life.

  18. Yesica Cruz

    Hi OUTOFMYMOUTH,

    I wanted to share my reflection on this article. I loved it and it has a lot of encouragement for many of us who were defeated one day but never lost!!!!

    Descriptive egoism correlates with the image of Hillary Clinton and the author where you find the psychological determination in achieving and succeeded into one of the most powerful and influential person/woman who’s reaching her dreams to becoming one of the most powerful image in this country. Confronted with moral uncertainty about her relationship as a wife and as a leader, relativism stands out as true as she continues to work towards becoming your friend, next door neighbor, and even your very First Lady President. But, because of her situational difference in her past and the hardship of her credibility, Democratic Revolution dominated Hillary Clinton in becoming the First Woman President! Let it be true, that regardless of where we stand in history, Hillary Clinton stands out as a leader, for many, as our future President, and the woman who one day stood in front of millions of viewers and asked for your vote to becoming your very first President.

  19. Diego Yepez

    Hilary Clinton was able to push her way into being who she is now thanks to all of her surroundings and how she was able to take advantage of that. I admire the different aspects of who she is but sometimes inconsistency is what makes her an uneasy person to trust in. Clinton lived through being by the side of a president who did well in office, her views and perspectives may not be entirely the same but the job she saw done once was something she was aiming for the second go around. Things happen, she’s Hilary Clinton, google her & check all she has & hasn’t done.

  20. Kendra Elmore

    I am glad to finally read a story that addresses the constant demands of business savvy woman in today’s society. Hilary Clinton in a mother and wife and that alone entails a certain level of responsibility in order to prevail. Her downfall in the campaign is a very real circumstance that can compare to many drastic changes going on in anyone’s life especially woman whether it’s divorce, death of child, or adultery. Yet we see victims of these circumstances get up everyday and go on about their business whether it’s walking a dog or getting their kids prepared because life goes on no matter how discouraged you may be about the result of a particular event.

    • You are absolutely correct. Life goes on. It always does. It doesn’t mean that life is easy or that things don’t happen that slow us down, but nothing can completely stop us but death.

  21. Sonny Meyers Graham

    As the Article stated in what I learned from Hillary Clinton she was prepared, determined,
    resilient, and self-accountable. Like the author, I was with her, then not, then with again because
    I was one of those Bernie Sanders supporters, then had to go back to Hillary again once she was
    officially named the party candidate. Similarly, I was also a fan of Jill Stein who was also a
    strong determined woman with perhaps even more challenges because she wasn’t a major party
    favorite.
    My admiration of Hillary is that she was a strong woman. Maybe that even worked against
    her at times because she was so strong that most people did not find her trustworthy. because
    they could not relate to her. I felt that Hillary was respectable, knowledgeable, and confident and
    by the time of the vote she was the best, most qualified, candidate. The sad point is that I found
    her most relatable in her concession speech. This highlighted her strength, her conviction and
    dedication for America as a country, and her emotional depth for women. Perhaps if this would
    have become more transparent to Americans in the beginning and she would have had a better
    outcome.
    As the author stated the two main things that are impressive about Hillary is that no matter
    what she faces she is able to pick up the pieces and carry on with in a dignified and respectable
    way. Sometimes it’s not about how you look when you are winning its how you are when you
    are defeated and humiliated that really shows the content of your character.

    • Sonny Meyers Graham

      #oomm

    • I like the point you made about Hillary being too strong and not relatable. I think you may be right about that. Obviously more people seemed to relate to Trump even though he was not nearly as polished as Hillary.That goes a long way. It’s good to know your audience so that you can relate.

  22. Reflection #1- “What I learned from Hilary Clinton”
    I’ll start this reflection with the points I found were positive and move on to points I don’t necessarily agree with. I like how the author constantly reminds the reader that you have the wheel to your life. You have to prepare yourself for any challenge that may present itself. This will ultimately lead to a better you, and a better life, perhaps the life you’ve always wanted (possibly). The author also states that you cannot control anyone but yourself. You can’t control your dog from leaving you, or in Hilary’s case, control the country into voting for her and not for “racist, elitist, jerk of a homophobe”. I personally strongly agree with this. The more you embrace the idea that you can only control your being and not others, the less disappointment you will face (E.G Hilarys loss in the 2016 Election).
    Now on to the points that I disagree with. First of all, I don’t think Hilary is “that girl you can invite over”. Hilary is a master manipulator, crafting her words very carefully to capture her audience. I won’t go into detail about this, but I will cite an example, the contents of her speeches to private donors’ vs speeches in her rallies to the public. Hilary also has a long line of scandals behind her, the Benghazi scandal, the private paid speeches, collaborating with the DNC to cheat Bernie Sanders out of the 2016 nomination.
    #oomm

    • You have some really good points. Hillary does have several scandals associated with her. Those are not to be overlooked and are part of the reason that Hillary is not exactly a best friend but maybe a friend of a friend. Thanks for sharing your perspective.

  23. Really important article, this gave me a whole different perspectives on the struggles Hillary had behind closed doors and how se was able to over come them and still fight on to achieving greater things.

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